Cookie (an acrostic poem)

Image: cdn.sallysbakingaddiction.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/6-chocolate-chip-cookies.jpg

Chocolate chips, brown sugar, vanilla extract play lead guitar

Oh, and all the stuff that gives it structure like a good back beat

Organize the lumps of raw dough on a baking sheet

Keeping good social distance between them

Igniting the oven and bringing it to temp so this party can get started

Everything comes out ooey, gooey, and so bad for you.  Yum!

For the recipe of the above pictured cookies go to: https://sallysbakingaddiction.com/giant-chocolate-chip-cookies/

(I have not tried them yet, but they look awesome!)

Flip (an acrostic poem)

 

Feeling like a coin spinning through the air

Listing endlessly from heads to tails and back again

It makes for an uncomfortable situation and fills those around you with apprehension.

Perhaps instead of chocolate or vanilla soft serve,  you might settle on your edge, twist!

 

Image:  sites.google.com/site/ciese07030/_/rsrc/1272031766806/Home/coin-flipping-probabilities/coin-flipping.jpg

Crush (an acrostic poem)

Craving more of you so much it hurts

Realizing that I should just call our affair off

Unrelenting you undermine my self-control

So badly that I give in and reach out for you again

How is it chocolate that you don’t love me back?

 

Image: us.123rf.com/450wm/korovin/korovin1403/korovin140300080/26793186-chocolate-heart-on-wooden-background-.jpg?ver=6

Lick (an acrostic poem)

Lounging in the shade, Marcus stared at his ice cream cone

It was dripping chocolate down the cone, almost touching his hand

Chills of pleasure went down his spine as he slurped up the drippings

Keeping his eyes closed in rapture, he didn’t see the rest of the ice cream tumble to the ground

 

Image: pngimg.com/uploads/ice_cream/ice_cream_PNG5083.png

Death By Chocolate

Craig ripped the cellophane off the box of assorted chocolates the Maggie had given him after their first date.  He showed the front of the box in front to her picture on his desk.  “You never really listened to me, even about the important stuff,” he said.  “Proof in point giving me this.  I told you how bad it was,  and yet you just tilted your head and told me to just give it to someone else.  Like I could do that since it was from you.”

Craig pulled off the cover and chucked it, and the map to the boxes’ contents, to the floor.   He took a piece of chocolate at random and shoved it into his face.  “Not that one,” he said while he chewed.  He grabbed a second one and popped it in before he had finished the first.  “Not that one either.”

Chocolate drool trickled down from the left corner of his mouth to his chin, but Craig didn’t care.  He picked up the picture and brought it and the chocolates over to his bed.  The chocolates spilled out as he flopped himself onto his stomach, the picture just inches from his head.   He reached for another chocolate and added it to the two he hadn’t finished yet.  “Damn, I hate strawberry.”  He spit out the whole wad of melted and masticated chocolate onto Maggie’s picture.  “Take that, bitch.”  He grabbed another chocolate and tore into it.  “Carmel is for losers.”  He threw the half he held in his hand onto the floor.

“Of course that’s what you think of me now,” Craig said.  He wiped away the chocolate waste from Maggie’s picture leaving a brown streak across her angelic blond framed face.  “That’s why you ditched me for Kevin Peterson, that jerk.”  He grabbed two chocolates, shoved them into his mouth, and bit down on them both.  “Come on!” he mumbled spitting chocolate shrapnel in front of him, “Why can’t I find one?”

He spit out the two chocolates on the floor and grabbed the closest six nearby.  He stuck each into his mouth, one by one, and then began the process of chewing.  A sad, sickly smile began to grow on his face.  He finally swallowed his mouthful of chocolate and sighed.

Craig reached over the bed and picked up his backpack.   He opened it and pulled out his epi pen.  “How will you feel knowing you killed me?” he yelled at the picture.  He then threw the epi pen across the room where is smashed into the wall.

Craig could feel his windpipe begin to close.  He laid back on the bed, placing Maggie’s picture on his chest and he held it tight.

Speed of Chocolate

I was looking for a bit of buy in, but Alex wasn’t about to cash out just yet.

“So you’re telling me that we can calculate the speed of light with a microwave and a candy bar?” Alex asked.

I nodded.  “That and a glass of water, a ruler and a calculator, isn’t that cool?” I asked.

Alex took two steps back, his arms waving in front of him.  “Oh no, that’s insane,” he said.

“Why are you freaking out?” I asked.  “It’s just an experiment.”

“I only have one more candy bar.  If I use it up no more chocolate for me till next week when mom goes to the store,” he responded.

“Just give me the chocolate and go get the ruler,” I said.  “We’re going to calculate the speed of light for goodness sakes.”

Alex reluctantly handed the chocolate bar to me.  “Are you sure this is going to work?” he asked.

“Of course,” I answered.  “It was on Facebook.  It has to be true.”  Alex seemed a bit more at ease now that the chocolate was out of his grasp.  I opened it up and took the chocolate out of its wrapper.  “Now go get the ruler,” I said.

Alex lumbered off and I set the rest of my experiment up.  I made sure to have the microwave closed by the time he got back.

Alex handed me the ruler.  “So what’s next?” he asked.

I paused for a minute, digesting my thoughts.  “You run the microwave for ten seconds.  I’ll be right back with the calculator that you forgot.” I said.

Alex got a little upset.  “You didn’t tell me you needed the calculator,” he said.

“You’re right,” I admitted.  “I’ll go get it.  Be right back.”

I ran to our room and went right past to the back door.  I let myself out quietly and was two steps away when I heard a scream.  I took off at a dead run, but Alex beat me to the gate to the front of the house.

“Where is my candy bar?” Alex screamed at me.

“It was in the microwave,” I said.

Alex shoved me to the ground.  “Uh-uh,” he said.  “That was just a glass of water.”

I tried to roll to my feet, but Alex pinned me to the ground.  He began to give me a noogie.  “Okay, okay, you win, that wasn’t your chocolate,” I said trying to defend myself.

Alex stopped for a moment.  “So where’s my chocolate?” he asked.

“It left at the speed of light,” I said.

“Speed of light?” Alex asked.

“Sure.  What happens to an object falling into a black hole?” I asked hoping he would fall for it.

“It speeds up till it is going at light speed,” Alex said smugly.  “I learned that watching YouTube.”

“Right.  You were paying attention,” I said as I wiggled a bit and he let me up.  I had only one shot at this.

“So what does that have to do with a microwave and a ruler and calculator?” Alex asked.

I leaned closer.  “You forgot the glass of water,” I said.

Alex pushed me out of his personal space.  I roll with it, taking a couple steps back.  “Who cares about the glass of stupid water.  How does that allow you to calculate the speed of light?” he asks.

“Simple.  By you doing all that, a small black hole appeared and sucked in the chocolate,” I said.

“Now you’re going to get beat,” Alex said stepping closer.  I took one step back, trying to maintain the same distance between us.

“No really,” I said.  “I can show you.”

Alex stopped and crossed his arms.  “Okay, you have one chance.  Show me.”

I took one more step back, opened my mouth wide, and pointed down my throat.  “See, right there is the black hole,” I said.

Before Alex could react I was off at full speed.  I was so glad I was a sprinter, or Alex would have shot putted me, and I might have seen light speed then since I am sure my lights would have gone out.