Reward (an acrostic poem)

 

Researching how to solve the problem

Eunice pondered what would be the best method

When she finally decided what she wanted to try

All the things went spectacularly wrong.

Resulting in an amazing learning opportunity

Didn’t realize that this would be her only …

 

Image: images.theage.com.au/2009/09/21/743959/present-420×0.jpg

Pony (an acrostic poem)

 

Purchasing the young horse was his first problem

Oh, and then there was finding a stable for it to live

Not even calculating the costs of feeding, veterinary help, and riding lessons

Yet the look on his six-year-old son’s face made it all worth it

 

Image:  usercontent1.hubstatic.com/12706092_f520.jpg

Teacher (an acrostic poem)

 

The problem seemed unsolvable

Everyone in the class vehemently agreed that it couldn’t be done

And Miss Snow wistfully agreed, but then she began to ask questions

Can you.. could you… how would you…

Having their preconceived notions challenged, they began to explore

Engaging the problem with new vigor, trying new possible solutions

Reaching the answer, they were proud to prove Miss Snow wrong.

 

Image: todayifoundout.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/apple.jpg

That’ll Fix Anything (a 50 word story)

The phone was broken, but he was sick of buying new ones.  He grabbed his screwdriver and contemplated how to attack the problem.  It was probably beyond his ability, but he was damn good with a screwdriver.  After drinking three of them it wasn’t fixed, but he didn’t care anymore.

 

Image: web-assets.sugru.com/hero/upload/16962/phone_with_broken_glass_screen.jpg

Sarcasm (an acrostic poem)

So many people these days just don’t get it

And that is a true problem of epic proportions

Reaching down deep to find that perfect level of irony

Capping it with a verbal twist of the vocal cords

Announces a superior intellect and competence

So much so that all should bow down to those who have mastered it

Maybe now you know what to do?

Save the Words! (a 150 word story)

And then there were no more words.  All writing stopped and the world took a pensive breath.  Soon the accusations flew.  The right, left, and center blamed each other on their frivolous use of such a precious commodity.    Large documents were written by scholars about the lack of words and what that meant for society.  Talking heads spewed countless hours of drivel about the cataclysmic problem.  Entire books were devoted to finding the solution to this disaster.

All hope was lost.  Shut off the lights, it was time to just give up.  There was nothing left to see hear.

She threw her pen down in disgust and went to bed, frustrated beyond belief.

The next day when she picked back up her pen the words spring out, and the world was saved.  Millions lived, some of them died, but the words went onward.

So goes the life of a writer.

 

Image:.felhaber.com/wp-content/uploads/words.jpg